Hypertufa in My Garden ~ A Look Of Aged Stone

photo of hypertufa on standHow can you not fall in love with these ancient-looking stone planters? These garden planters are called hypertufa.

These aged-stone-looking garden planters are made with hypertufa which is a mixture of Portland cement, vermiculite, (or perlite) and peat moss. This mixture cures into a stone-like planter that is heavy and durable, but lighter than cement. You can create your own faux cement garden planters in any shape you want.

The surface of hypertufa has an aged appearance due to the peat inside the mix which deteriorates over time leaving the surface dimpled which seems to be from the passage of time. Moss or lichens grow upon the surface just adding to the aged appearance.

I love that look!

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Have you heard about the Draped Cement Pots or Draped Hypertufa?

Check here for the instructions and videos to learn how to make these. It’s easy and fun. They can be stained or painted any color and holes can be drilled in them easily since they are just thin “concrete.”
Here on the site you will find a detailed explanation of how to make your own.
It is like being a child and playing in the mud.
I have my recipes and videos too!  You can make a beautiful ancient-looking container yourself ! Draped Fabric Pots Draped Fabric Pots

Oh-Possibilities-Draped-Hypertufa-gardener

 

And you can plant it any way you like. You are NOT limited to succulents or cactus. You can make a lovely shade dish or trough for your shade garden.
And I will show you how to make moss grow on it! Grow Moss !

muscari

 

How about a hypertufa planter but without the cement?

I call this “Almost” Hypertufa.  “Almost” Hypertufa
It’s made from any discarded styrofoam box!  And you can do it in a few hours and be ready to plant the next day. I have a full page with instructions on how to do this easily. And since there doesn’t have to be any cement, you can plant it right away or apply a layer of mortar to make it seem as if it is the real thing……a real hypertufa garden planter.

Sedum "Lime Zinger"

                                                                                                                            Sedum “Lime Zinger”

 

Come and explore and you will learn about hypertufa and how wonderfully it can enhance your garden. Maybe you will fall in love with it as I have.

If you need to see it demonstrated, I have a lot of videos showing me in action making these hypertufa projects.

Video Tutorials

Take a look around the site and find something you like. Make it and you will be hooked on hypertufa forever. It is such an awesome garden planter to have as a focal point in the landscape or as a patio planter in your garden.
Be sure to leave some comments for me. I appreciate each one. I like to hear what you think about the pictures and posts. I will try and answer any questions you may have.

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21 comments for “Hypertufa in My Garden ~ A Look Of Aged Stone

  1. FRancois
    January 25, 2015 at 1:56 pm

    Hallo Kim !
    Very interesting !! Just a question….as you may expect the materials used may not be that easy to find here (apart from the cement !)…I see companies here advertising “expanded Perlite” for gardening use. Will that be fine to use in the hypertufa mix ????

    I am in South Africa

    • Kim
      January 25, 2015 at 4:35 pm

      Hello Francois! I looked up the “expanded perlite” and it appears to be the same or very similar to my horticultural perlite. It is a gritty. coarse, very light, even a little bit dusty material. Photos appear to show the same stuff. Just be cautious and use a mask when dipping it, just as you would the Portland cement. My perlite is in a bale/bag about 2 cubic feet. Light enough for me to lift easy. You should be good with that. I find the best price at a garden supply store for supplies for greenhouses and big growers/farmers. Good luck.

  2. Marla
    January 11, 2015 at 12:57 pm

    I cannot wait to try making these with my 4-H Club. My Mom had a cement planter with large pieces of glass on the outside. Have you done anything like?

  3. January 8, 2015 at 9:35 pm

    Hi Kim! I love this post. I’m not much of a gardener, but maybe I can learn a few things from you!

    • Kim
      January 8, 2015 at 9:41 pm

      Thanks for stopping by and reading. I think we will all be better with help from each other. Your site is amazing!

  4. Hester Russell
    January 3, 2015 at 6:39 am

    Your stuff is lovely. I also made cement pots but only use cement and water with a little Sikalite- that’s to make the cement harder. I found some materials does not work for and the best is old towels.

    • Kim
      January 3, 2015 at 5:07 pm

      Thanks so much. I will have to look into Sikalite and try that. I have found that a fleece blanket (cut into smaller sections) works best for me. And towels too, they add their own texture!

  5. Lee
    January 2, 2015 at 4:02 pm

    Hi, love the pots and draped pots. Can you tell me what the purpose of the peat is?

    • Kim
      January 2, 2015 at 4:35 pm

      Thanks for your comments. When making hypertufa, we are making a “lighter” version of a cement pot. So the filler is the peat which slowly degrades and leaves the textured holes and “spongelike” look for the hypertufa planter. You can use coir, and I have heard some use black soil which is a great percentage peat anyway. As for the draped pots, its singular strength is the Portland cement so in this case, it is just for a little bit a texture. I think it made the pot look like tree bark, eh?

  6. marty
    November 13, 2014 at 12:01 am

    Hello….I was wondering if you have ever made small houses from the hypertufa? I’ve been searching the web but have not found anything of how to build the house. Thank you.

    • Kim
      November 13, 2014 at 6:57 am

      Sorry, Marty. I have not made any of the small fairy houses. I see a lot of pictures thru Pinterest and around the web, but no directions. Someone may chime in and let us know? Maybe that is something I should try?

  7. Esther
    August 31, 2014 at 9:05 pm

    I love all of your work. Thank you for your assist on GW. I will begin my hypertufa pond next weekend. I hope I can ask you some other questions just so that I feel a little more confident doing my pond project. I will have my hubby or daughter take pictures as I go and would love to share them with you. Please let me know if that’s ok. I will keep looking at more of your pictures and videos. Your work with hypertufa inspires me. Thank you. Esther, aka LatinaSoul on GW.

    • Kim
      September 1, 2014 at 4:58 am

      Thanks, Esther. I would love to see pictures of your pond. There is a Facebook Page under this same name. Feel free to share there and we can get a lot of opinions and help. I think the pond will be wonderful.

    • katknight4@gmail.com
      October 28, 2014 at 5:50 pm

      Pond? are you making a pond out of Hypertufa? I am loving these
      ideas

      • Kim
        October 28, 2014 at 7:35 pm

        It appears she is, but I haven’t heard anything about how it turned out. Let us know, Esther!

  8. Shirley Robinson
    August 6, 2014 at 3:29 pm

    You are not the only one making hypetufa . There is a face book called hypertufa. I have been making these pots and a couple of drapes on pails. I can’t wait to watch your video.
    Shirley

    • Kim
      August 6, 2014 at 8:16 pm

      Love that someone else is making them too! Love to see pictures of yours. Post them on the Facebook Page?

  9. Dorothy McGinnis
    July 27, 2014 at 2:54 pm

    How wonderful you are to share all this information. Your hypertufa and your plant choices are just great. I have wanted to do this and still may after our summer heat has gone downs some. Living in Texas. our weather is a little different than yours.

    This is my all-time best website to view. Since I’m 75 and not in good health, anything I try will have to be small, but I so hope to do something. Oh, how I wish I lived close enough to know you. What a super person you must be. I will be watching your website on my pain days and imagining what it would be like to be in your garden. Thank you so much for the time you have spent sharing what you have learned.

    • July 27, 2014 at 6:06 pm

      Dorothy, how sweet of you! You may like doing some little ones. I have some that I have made from yogurt containers, and I call them my cupcake tufas. Just room for a little hen or two, or maybe some tiny urchin. I may not have posted pictures on the website, but maybe there are some on the Facebook Page of the same name. And I sure bet we could share some garden stories, too! Hope you keep comfortable, and without too much pain.

  10. ron
    July 25, 2014 at 10:55 pm

    Great website, I’m addicted to hypertufa and your videos are a great help and inspiration. This past summer I made 4 pots with great success but I had to use my own formula 3 parts Portland 1 part peat and 1 part perlite. Its a little heavier of a mixture it works for me. tomorrow I plan on using a plastic jack o lantern as a mold and use my dremel saw to cut it when cured. I will try your draping hypertufa pots. I do have some problems with color, since im too cheap to buy concrete color I tried fabric dye, black turns light grey, Yellow or brown no effect.
    Mistake paint from home depot is so so, if the color is really loud like flouresent orange. also made some rock borders. I dug shapes in the ground lined it with plastic and added the hypertufa, I think they look like the real thing.
    thanks for this site, sometimes I feel like im the only one doing this,

    • July 26, 2014 at 5:54 am

      Thanks, Ron. I know what you mean about being the only one doing this. I don’t see many people doing this, but I can’t help myself. I just love the look and I always want to try something new or different. Tried the paint thing, but mostly I just apply to the outside if I decide I want different color. Jack O Lantern sounds interesting!

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