Trying My Pilea Peperomioides Outside In Hypertufa

It is wonderful to have the warm weather back here in Ohio, and yes, I can admit, sometimes it is uncomfortably warm. But now I get to put so many plants outside and I can get water all over the place! Guess what? This year I am putting my Pilea peperimiodes outside!

image of potted pilea peperomioides

Truthfully, it is not really an outdoor houseplant, I guess. But I am curious to see how it will behave in some bright outdoor light, cycling from heated days and cooler nights, experiencing the misty mornings and cool evenings. I really want to see if that prompts more growth…and more babies!

It really all about the babies.

Potting Up the Pilea in Hypertufa

I have chosen one of my square hypertufa planters for this outdoor venture for the Pilea. Since my hypertufa is porous and drains well by its very nature, I think that would be a great environment for the plant.

image of a hypertufa pot

Care for the Pilea outdoors will probably only differ by making sure she has adequate water. Grouping her with some of my other plants that need more water will help me remember to water her more often than some of my succulents.

She can be grouped with some ferns, tiny pots that lose moisture quickly, and my Baby’s Tears. They all like moisture, just not too much.

image of water droplets on pilea peperomioides

Roots on the Pilea Peperomioides

The Pilea that we transplanted into hypertufa came from a large deep planter that had about five larger plants and many small ones growing around the bottom. As we dug up the Pilea, we see these long strands of roots that appear to have tiny new plants in their first stages of growth, seeking a way to the top of the soil to burst into a green plant.

image of pilea roots

My video will show you even better how these roots look. Please check it out and let me know if you have any comments, suggestions or anything to tell me. I even took some of the broken leftovers and planted them, just to see if they will grow new plants.

This particular Pilea peperomioides appears to have outgrown its pot without even showing any symptoms. I would never have known how many were trying to grow. Can you see all those tiny specks of green where a new plant is trying to get started? Amazing!

closeup image of tiny pilea sprouts

 

Well, of course I ended up planting more than one. I added another hypertufa pot that I colored with chemicals. That color seems to go well with the green of those tiny umbrella leaves. Yes, I went overboard. But these plants are so great. Now I have more to share!

image of four potted Pilea

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.