My Indoor Houseplant Pilea Glauca Is Going Outside In A Hypertufa Bowl

One of my cutest houseplants is a Pilea glauca ( also called Red Stem Pilea, Silver Sparkles Pilea, Gray Baby Tears) and that is because I like tiny plants and trailing plants and this is both of those.

I have also seen this plant listed as Pilea libanensis too, so I am not really sure which is correct. I like the name of Red Stem Baby Tears a lot because that is exactly how she looks. She is just a stronger and “sturdier” plant. Baby’s Tears seems so fragile and delicate.

Previously I had this plant blooming for me in the fall during the time I needed get it re-potted to take it inside. It will not survive my winter here in OHIO, Zone 6, so it has to go inside. You can see that post here.

image of pilea glauca

What I have decided to do this year is plant some outside in a hypertufa bowl. I think Pilea glauca planted in hypertufa will be a great match. I love a cascading or trailing plant and since this one sends out long stems which can be pinched off and pushed back into the soil to make an even more bushy planting.

image of cuttings rooting
Cuttings of Pilea glauca will root quickly in water or soil.

Pilea glauca can be rooted in water as I did in this post.   So I may root a few more cuttings so that I can have “spares.” I think it could be a good plant to include in other group arrangements so that it can grow as a mulch plus cascade over the sides.

Let’s Plant Pilea glauca in Hypertufa

The hypertufa bowl I have chosen is a medium sized one that I made late last year and stained with ferrous sulfate. Read about that in this post.   I think the rusty color of it will contrast well with the smokey gray of the leaves not to mention the reddish or deep orange of the stems. If it doesn’t look right, I can plant it into another one. I have made enough, for sure.

Pilea glauca can grow in sunlight or artificial light, but it doesn’t like direct hot sun. She does well in a terrarium, but will grow in a regular open pot easily. She sometimes gets a little finicky, to me, as she likes it moist, not wet…dry her out, but don’t let her get too dry. If she gets too dry, she will pout and drop leaves quickly. So test her frequently to make sure she has enough moisture.

image of new hypertufa pot
Hypertufa ready for planting Pilea glauca

She should like being re-potted at this time because it is near spring and she will be beginning to resume a growth period. Fresh soil will help to move that along and I plan to water her with my fertilizer at each watering. This is the fertilizer I like and I am including my #affiliate link. Shultz Liquid Houseplant Fertilizer

If you try it I know you will like it. Just put the required drops into each watering container and you can freely water your plants without fear of burning their roots. This is a very diluted form and so easy to use.

Thanks for reading and be sure to  PIN to your houseplant board. Watch the video too!

 

Kim, The Hypertufa Gardener

Hi, I am Kim and thank you so much for visiting my magazine! I am a gardener and a hypertufa maker. If you came here to learn about hypertufa, I have a lot of information. But I also write about flower gardening and using succulents which are great drought-tolerant plants.

Of course, I have some recipes and some random family concerns which I hope interest you too! Please page through the Magazine and find what you like! and Subscribe!

I also have a YouTube channel called Kim’s Gardens where you can see my hypertufa as I make them. ( See My About Page)

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